Liquid robotics glider


The vehicles host sensor payloads such as: Headquartered in Sunnyvale, California , the company was founded in The Wave Glider is composed of two parts: The Wave Glider leverages the difference in motion between the ocean surface and the calmer water below to create forward propulsion.

No fuel is required for operation which enables it to stay at sea for long durations. Changes include advancements for expanded sensor payloads and increased energy and storage capacity required for long duration maritime surveillance, environmental monitoring and observation missions. Solar panels recharge batteries which supply the power for the onboard sensor payloads, communications, computing, and enables a thruster propulsion system that provides additional navigational thrust for challenging ocean conditions doldrums through high seas.

The vehicle can be programmed for autonomous operation, or it can be piloted remotely. Wave Gliders are used for defense, maritime surveillance, commercial, oil and gas, and science and research applications. Since , Wave Gliders have been deployed in many areas of the global ocean, from the Arctic to the Southern Ocean.

In Liquid Robotics was awarded the Guinness World Record for the "longest journey by an autonomous, unmanned surface vehicle on the planet".

The Digital Ocean is an initiative originated by Liquid Robotics to collaboratively establish the data collection and communications infrastructure needed to support the Internet of Things for the ocean. The vision for the Digital Ocean is a networked ocean connecting billions of sensors, manned and unmanned systems, and satellites above.

The Wave Glider was originally invented to record the singing of humpback whales and transmit the songs back to shore. After a few years of experimenting, he enlisted the Hine family to help develop an unmoored, station-keeping data buoy.

Roger Hine, a mechanical engineer and robotics expert from Stanford University, spent a year on the project experimenting with different designs and energy sources. In January , endurance testing began when a Wave Glider completed a nine-day circumnavigation of Hawaii 's Big Island. With this energy source, Wave Gliders can spend many months at a time at sea , collecting and transmitting ocean data.

The vehicles host sensor payloads such as: Headquartered in Sunnyvale, California , the company was founded in The Wave Glider is composed of two parts: The Wave Glider leverages the difference in motion between the ocean surface and the calmer water below to create forward propulsion. No fuel is required for operation which enables it to stay at sea for long durations. Changes include advancements for expanded sensor payloads and increased energy and storage capacity required for long duration maritime surveillance, environmental monitoring and observation missions.

Solar panels recharge batteries which supply the power for the onboard sensor payloads, communications, computing, and enables a thruster propulsion system that provides additional navigational thrust for challenging ocean conditions doldrums through high seas.

The vehicle can be programmed for autonomous operation, or it can be piloted remotely. Wave Gliders are used for defense, maritime surveillance, commercial, oil and gas, and science and research applications.

Since , Wave Gliders have been deployed in many areas of the global ocean, from the Arctic to the Southern Ocean. In Liquid Robotics was awarded the Guinness World Record for the "longest journey by an autonomous, unmanned surface vehicle on the planet". The Digital Ocean is an initiative originated by Liquid Robotics to collaboratively establish the data collection and communications infrastructure needed to support the Internet of Things for the ocean.

The vision for the Digital Ocean is a networked ocean connecting billions of sensors, manned and unmanned systems, and satellites above.

The Wave Glider was originally invented to record the singing of humpback whales and transmit the songs back to shore. After a few years of experimenting, he enlisted the Hine family to help develop an unmoored, station-keeping data buoy. Roger Hine, a mechanical engineer and robotics expert from Stanford University, spent a year on the project experimenting with different designs and energy sources.